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When you’re deciding on which home to buy, a thorough home inspection is needed to make sure that you know all the faults of the home you want to buy before you make an offer. Home inspections save buyers valuable time and money by alerting them of problems the sellers may need to fix. That’s why for you to know what to expect from a home inspection.

When it comes to home inspections, you as a buyer should already know much about the home you will be getting. That doesn’t mean you have no role to play in the inspection itself, however. In the following article, Brendon Desimone of Zillow explains that buyers have important tasks to fulfill ahead of and during the inspection:

You, the buyer

You’re there to learn as much about the property as possible. But you should have already done your homework before the big day.

Before the inspection, review the seller’s property disclosures or building department documentation you received along the way. The listing agent may have pointed out some known issues. Write down a list of questions or concerns you have about the home.

Block out a few hours on the day, depending on what you need to inspect. Ask your real estate agent which inspections are typical in your market. Most inspections go smoothly, but some can be the beginning of tough negotiations. Read full article here…

As the buyer, you’re the one who’ll be living in that house for a long while. Researching ahead of time only helps the inspector, and your prospects as well.

Playing a minimal role in the inspection is one thing, but it’s another thing entirely to skip the event altogether. A buyer should always be present, even if the inspector refuses to allow them to be there, which is a red flag in and of itself: A recent post from Home Inspector describes how not attending is advised against:

Not attending the home inspection

Consider it a red flag if the inspector refuses to allow you to attend the home inspection. By joining him or her, you’ll gain insight into the condition of the systems, materials, and equipment in your prospective home, ensure that the inspector walks the entire property and provides answers to your questions about repairs that may be in your future.

Keep tabs with a detailed list of potential problems at hot spots. (Consider bringing this list with you should you home-shop again, so you’ll be even wiser next time.) Via homeinspector.org

The ideal inspector educates the buyer on what he’s seeing. It’s the best time for you to ask questions about the home and how it works. Most importantly, you can gain important info on potential repairs, which will help in negotiations.

A home inspection is important!

While home inspections are essential to buyers, they don’t reveal everything about a home. A house with an excellent report doesn’t necessarily mean you should leap on it- there are other factors about the home you should take into account, according to this informative article from Trulia:

8 Ways to Test Out a Home Before Making an Offer

Before you step foot in a potential new place, play the role of private investigator and do a few drive-bys. What’s the foot traffic like in the neighborhood? Do the strolling neighbors look more like young professionals or marrieds with children? How much noise do the neighbors make? (Sneak in a Saturday night visit to get the full taste.) If you drive to work, test your morning and evening commutes and time how long it takes you. Read full list here…

A house can be perfect in a structural sense, but doing your own inspection by testing the home can give you a good idea on if the place is worth living in or not. Either way, the value a good inspection provides the buyer can’t be overstated.

Either way, the value a good inspection provides the buyer can’t be overstated. It can (and does) tip negotiations into their favor.

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